The Early Radio London Fab Forties
Sunday 15th August 1965

As this pic sleeve shows, 'What's New Pussycat' and 'With These Hands' was a double-sided release on the continent.

In the UK, 'Hands' was released first (Decca F12191) c/w 'Untrue', while 'Pussycat' (Decca F12203) had a song called 'Rose' as its B-side. The singles appeared in the Nationals in that order, 'Hands' reaching #13, 'Pussycat' climbing to #11. However, the reverse is happening in this week's Fab, as 'Pussycat' climbs from #27 to #18, while 'Hands' slides from #15 to #33!

'What's New Pussycat' is the title track from Woody Allen's first major film, which also starred Peter Sellers. (The original film soundtrack, composed by Burt Bacharach is here.)
Last
This
 
Week
Week
4
1
Everyone's Gone To The Moon Jonathan King
3
2
Help! Beatles
6
3
I Want Candy Brian Poole & the Tremeloes
2
4
Catch Us If You Can Dave Clark Five
1
5
We've Gotta Get Out Of This Place Animals
10
6
Zorba's Dance Marcello Minerbi
24
7
I Got You Babe Sonny & Cher
19
8
See My Friend Kinks
13
9
All I Really Want To Do Byrds / Cher
16
10
Unchained Melody Righteous Brothers
14
11
Don't Make My Baby Blue Shadows
21
12
Make It Easy On Yourself Walker Brothers
7
13
Cry To Me Pretty Things
8
14
Too Many Rivers Brenda Lee
9
15
You've Got Your Troubles Fortunes
18
16
In Thoughts Of You Billy Fury
5
17
I Can't Help Myself Four Tops
27
18
What's New Pussycat? Tom Jones
11
19
Summer Nights Marianne Faithfull
17
20
He's Got No Love Searchers
12
21
(Say) You're My Girl Roy Orbison
30
22
Yakety Axe Chet Atkins
29
23
Seventh Son Johnny Rivers
32
24
You're My Girl Rockin' Berries
25
Laugh At Me Sonny
31
26
Day By Day Julie Rogers
22
27
Heart Full Of Soul Yardbirds
28
Il Silenzio Nini Rosso
25
29
The Secret Of My Success Chantelles
30
I'll Never Get Over You Everly Brothers
20
31
Like We Used To Be Georgie Fame & the Blue Flames
32
Ju Ju Hand Sam the Sham & the Pharaohs
15
33
With These Hands Tom Jones
34
Hurt Me If You Will Mark Four
39
35
Follow Me Drifters
36
Down In The Boondocks Billy Joe Royal
37
Universal Soldier (EP) Donovan
38
That's The Way I Must Go Headliners
39
Whatcha Gonna Do About It? Small Faces
34
40
That's The Way Honeycombs

 

Up two places – Billy Fury

34
Hurt Me If You Will Mark Four Decca F 12204

According to the Record Collector Rare Record Price Guide, a mint copy of Hurt Me if You Will could set you back a cool £50.

(click on the picture for an Amazon link to more information about the Record Collector Rare Record Price Guide)

Fab notes from Alan Field:
The Mark Four formed out of a group called the Blue Jacks around the beginning of 1964. Despite the name there were five members: Kenny Pickett (vocals), Eddie Phillips (lead guitar), John Dalton (bass guitar), Mick Thompson (rhythm guitar) and Jack Jones (drums). Hurt Me If You Will was a Pickett-Phillips composition.

For a while the Mark Four were one of the top local bands around north London and Hertfordshire and the four singles they recorded have all become highly sought-after, especially in view of the famous comings and goings that followed. Dalton joined the Kinks and in 1966 Pickett, Phillips and Jones joined with Bob Garner (formerly of Tony Sheridan's Band and the Merseybeats) and the group evolved into Creation. Under this name they hit the Fab 40 twice in 1966, with Making Time in June and Painter Man in September. When Pickett left for a while, Bob Garner took over on vocals and Kim Gardner, from the (British) Birds, came in on bass. Phillips left Creation at the end of 1967, to be replaced by Ronnie Wood. Musically acclaimed – Eddie Phillips was reputedly the first to play guitar with a violin bow – but always more popular on the continent than in the UK, Creation split in the summer of 1968.

Kim Gardner went on to greater success with Ashton Gardner & Dyke, reaching #3 in 1971 with Resurrection Shuffle. Ronnie Wood found fame with the Faces and the Rolling Stones. Kenny Pickett became a roadie for Led Zeppelin and also co-wrote Clive Dunn's 1970 #1, Grandad! Sadly, Kenny died in 1997 and Kim Gardner died in 2001.

DJ Climbers:    
Hark Unit 4 + 2 Pete Brady
One Of These Days Guy Darrell Dave Dennis
Little Pictures Adam, Mike & Tim Paul Kaye
I Have Cried My Last Tear Cliff Bennett & the Rebel Rousers Earl Richmond
The Time In Between Cliff Richard & the Shadows Ed Stewart

Fab notes from Alan Field:

It's rare to find a climber assigned to two different disc jockeys in successive weeks, but there are two examples in this list. The Cliff Bennett single was Paul Kaye's climber last week, Earl Richmond's climber this week. And Hark by Unit 4 + 2 was TW's climber last week, Pete Brady's climber this week. (I bet they thought nobody would notice! – Mary)

Little Pictures Adam, Mike & Tim Decca F 12221

Adam, Mike and Tim were a Liverpudlian folk-pop harmony group. Their line-up was Tim Saunders, Mike Sedgewick and Mike's brother Peter, whom the others apparently didn't know from Adam! In 1966 the trio covered the Dave Dennis fave by the Statler Brothers, Flowers on the Wall then Paul Simon's A Most Peculiar Man, but failed to chart.

In 1968, Mike Sedgewick issued a solo single by the intriguing title of The Good Guys in the White Hats Never Lose.

Climbers:  
Down In The Boondocks Gregory Phillips
Disc of the Week:  
(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction Rolling Stones

Fab notes from Alan Field and Mary Payne:

Down In The Boondocks Gregory Phillips Immediate IM 004

Two versions of Down In The Boondocks were receiving airplay on Big L this week. The US original by Billy Joe Royal (CBS 201802), a #9 Hot Hundred hit written by Joe South, enters the Fab at #36. The single was eagerly pounced upon by Kenny and Cash and spliced up into a jingle.

The British cover by Gregory Phillips never got beyond Climber status. The Record Collector Rare Record Price Guide puts a value of 15 on a mint copy, because the A-side was arranged by Jimmy Page and produced by Andrew Oldham and the B-side is a Page instrumental called That's The One.

Gregory Phillips achieved more notoriety as an actor than as a singer. As a child, he appeared in films with major stars such as Judy Garland, Dirk Bogarde, Peter Finch and Anne Bancroft. Many biographies list Gregory as a member of the Liverpool band the Remo Four, but he was actually the third singer to be backed by the band, following vocalists Tommy Quickly and Johnny Sandon.

John Kearney conducted an excellent interview with Gregory, in which he tells of his acting career, the 'groovy people' he knew on the Sixties scene and how he came to sign to the Immediate label. These days, he runs a music therapy clinic for psychiatric patients.

John kindly gave permission for an extract of his interview to be reproduced. Here, Greg is speaking of his friendship with Steve Marriott of the Small Faces:

I remember Steve and I got together when he was out of 'Oliver' and he'd got a recording contract, it might have been with Don Arden and he made a record called 'Give Her My Regards' and he said to the company, "I've got this mate of mine, who I'm at school with and he's a good singer and you know, how about him coming in and thinking about letting him make a record too?" He was always looking after me. I remember a couple of times when he was with the Small Faces and he was recording and he'd say, "Hey why don't you do this track?" and I did a couple of vocals with the band, very badly I seem to remember!

When Steve was setting up Humble Pie, he had a lovely thatched cottage in Essex and I used to go down with a girlfriend – that was really nice. Lots of animals and he was really relaxed. He had the radio on non-stop there, I can't remember what their first single was (editor's note: 'Natural Born Bugie'), but it came on the radio and Jerry Shirley was down at the house, he looked about 12 then but I guess he was about 15 and they were just so excited, you know. Steve was over the moon, he never lost the joy of hearing his single on the radio, nothing to do with fame and fortune, it was just a blast. He was a lovely lovely guy. We always kept in contact, but I hadn't seen Steve for quite a while before he died. A girlfriend of mine had spent some time with him and she said he was feeling pretty down, so I did try and contact him, but I never got through.

(Webmaster's note: According to available information, Humble Pie drummer Jerry Shirley was born in 1952, which would have made him a couple of years older in 1969 than Greg's estimate of fifteen. Since this page was compiled, the full John Kearney interview has disappeared from the internet.)

Most of us in the UK remained completely mystified as to the nature of a 'boondock', until 2001, when Caroline's Bud Ballou finally enlightened us. Someone who comes from the boondocks will be labelled even more of an outcast than someone who hails from 'way out in the sticks'! (A real-life 'nowhere man', in fact.). Song lyrics here.

Meanwhile ashore.... August 15th 1965 proved a very memorable occasion for Pete Brady. While compering a beat contest, he was dragged off stage, lost some of his clothes and made the news headlines! Full story here.

Tune in next week for another Big L Fab 40!

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